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cool-critters:

Irukandji jellyfish 
Irukandji jellyfish are small and extremely venomous jellyfish that inhabit marine waters of Australia. But according to a National Geographic documentary on jellyfish the species has been found in waters as far north as the British Isles, Japan, and the Floridacoast of the United States. They are able to fire their stingers into their victim, causing symptoms collectively known as Irukandji syndrome. The Irukandji syndrome is produced by a small amount of venom and induces excruciating muscle cramps in the arms and legs, severe pain in the back and kidneys, a burning sensation of the skin and face, headaches, nausea, restlessness, sweating, vomiting, an increase in heart rate and blood pressure, and psychological phenomena such as the feeling of impending doom. The symptoms last from hours to weeks, and victims usually require hospitalisation. The size of the Irukandji jellyfish is roughly a cubic centimetre (1 cm3). There are 4 known species of Irukandji. photo credits: wikipedia, deadlylist, life-sea
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cool-critters:

Irukandji jellyfish

Irukandji jellyfish are small and extremely venomous jellyfish that inhabit marine waters of Australia. But according to a National Geographic documentary on jellyfish the species has been found in waters as far north as the British Isles, Japan, and the Floridacoast of the United States. They are able to fire their stingers into their victim, causing symptoms collectively known as Irukandji syndrome. The Irukandji syndrome is produced by a small amount of venom and induces excruciating muscle cramps in the arms and legs, severe pain in the back and kidneys, a burning sensation of the skin and face, headaches, nausea, restlessness, sweating, vomiting, an increase in heart rate and blood pressure, and psychological phenomena such as the feeling of impending doom. The symptoms last from hours to weeks, and victims usually require hospitalisation. The size of the Irukandji jellyfish is roughly a cubic centimetre (1 cm3). There are 4 known species of Irukandji. photo credits: wikipedia, deadlylist, life-sea

montereybayaquarium:

Our Stumpy Cuttlefish are Laying Eggs!

There’s a lot going on with the stumpy cuttlefish in our Tentacles exhibit. Males are putting on their formal wear, turning jet black and rippling their fins, trying to attract females. The courtship efforts have not been in vain—you can clearly see black clusters of eggs on exhibit, which “look like dark grapes,” according to Aquarist Bret Grasse. Scientists think that the eggs are black because the female wraps them in a bit of ink, making them less palatable to predators. 

“They’re laying them on exhibit every day,” says Bret. The “stumpies”—like most cuttlefish on exhibit—are cultivated right here at the Aquarium, reducing the need to collect in the wild. We also occasionally donate babies to other accredited institutions. 

Stumpy cuttlefish (Sepia bandensis) is a squat species that forages along the seafloor. It may be small, but it’s a mighty hunter. It hunkers down among rocks, coral, sand and algae, blending with its environment, then ambushes prey. Its native range is from Malaysia to the Philippines.

Learn more about our Tentacles exhibit

tssfxx:

helllotittys:

have—not:

i love this photo because at first you think that she was going to get married but instead her husband to be left her, or something like that. but actually its quite the opposite. i clicked on the source and it brought me to an article explaining the story behind this photo, and shes not crying, shes hungover. her and her husband went to a football game on their wedding day, and got extremely drunk and partied all night. they took the subway home because they couldn’t drive. so no, its not a sad heartbreaking story, its a crazy joyful one. which in my opinion makes the picture even more amazing.

CAN PEOPLE PLEASE REBLOG THE PIC WITH THIS CAPTION^ AND NOT THE ONE WHERE EVERYONE IS SAD AND ARE LIKE “POOR GIRL GOD BLESS”

trynottodrown:

Description & Behavior
Cookiecutter sharks, Isistius brasiliensis (Quoy and Gaimard, 1824), aka cookie-cutter shark, smalltooth cookiecutter shark or cigar shark, are small, deepwater sharks named for the cookie-shaped wounds they leave on larger fish and marine mammals.
Cookiecutter sharks live in the warm, deep waters of equatorial oceans, primarily in coastal waters near islands. They inhabit deep waters below 1,000 m during the day and migrate into surface waters at night at around 300 m. They have been found in depths up to 3,500 m.
Feeding Behavior (Ecology)
Cookiecutter sharks, appear to blend with the light from above when viewed from below due to the shark’s ventral photophores that disguise the shark’s outline. The primary prey of the cookiecutter shark are squid, small fish (likebristlemouths), and crustaceans.
This shark also feeds on larger pelagic animals such as wahoo, tuna, billfishes, and marine mammals. It is a facultative ectoparasite, which means that it feeds on the flesh of other species causing them harm but not death and it is not dependent on these species for survival.
A dark patch on the ventral surface of the cookiecutter shark resembles a smaller fish when viewed from below and is thought to lure larger fish and marine mammals that may be swimming beneath it. When this sneaky predator attacks its prey, it grabs hold of the flesh with its lips and bites using its small, sharp upper teeth to grip the prey while it cuts the flesh with the large, serrated lower teeth. The cookiecutter shark then spins its body to remove a “cookie-shaped” plug of flesh which it swallows before releasing its prey.
Unlike other shark species that lose teeth individually, the teeth of the cookiecutter shark are shed as a single unit. The bottom teeth are swallowed, possibly to help maintain calcium levels in the body.
Life History
Cookiecutter sharks are ovoviviparous. Hatching takes places between 12-22 months with 6-12 pups per litter. When the young emerge, they are fully developed and able to hunt for food by themselves. Males mature at 36 cm and can grow to a size of 42cm. Females mature at 39 cm and can reach up to 56 cm.
Ovoviviparous: eggs are retained within the body of the female in a brood chamber where the embryo develops, receiving nourishment from a yolk sac. This is the method of reproduction for the “live-bearing” fishes where pups hatch from egg capsules inside the mother’s uterus and are born soon afterward. Also known as aplacental viviparous.
Conservation Status & Comments
The cookiecutter shark has been reported to also attack the rubber sonar domes of submarines. Due to its deep sea habitat and small size, it is no danger to humans.
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trynottodrown:

Description & Behavior

Cookiecutter sharks, Isistius brasiliensis (Quoy and Gaimard, 1824), aka cookie-cutter shark, smalltooth cookiecutter shark or cigar shark, are small, deepwater sharks named for the cookie-shaped wounds they leave on larger fish and marine mammals.

Cookiecutter sharks live in the warm, deep waters of equatorial oceans, primarily in coastal waters near islands. They inhabit deep waters below 1,000 m during the day and migrate into surface waters at night at around 300 m. They have been found in depths up to 3,500 m.

Feeding Behavior (Ecology)

Cookiecutter sharks, appear to blend with the light from above when viewed from below due to the shark’s ventral photophores that disguise the shark’s outline. The primary prey of the cookiecutter shark are squid, small fish (likebristlemouths), and crustaceans.

This shark also feeds on larger pelagic animals such as wahoo, tuna, billfishes, and marine mammals. It is a facultative ectoparasite, which means that it feeds on the flesh of other species causing them harm but not death and it is not dependent on these species for survival.

A dark patch on the ventral surface of the cookiecutter shark resembles a smaller fish when viewed from below and is thought to lure larger fish and marine mammals that may be swimming beneath it. When this sneaky predator attacks its prey, it grabs hold of the flesh with its lips and bites using its small, sharp upper teeth to grip the prey while it cuts the flesh with the large, serrated lower teeth. The cookiecutter shark then spins its body to remove a “cookie-shaped” plug of flesh which it swallows before releasing its prey.

Unlike other shark species that lose teeth individually, the teeth of the cookiecutter shark are shed as a single unit. The bottom teeth are swallowed, possibly to help maintain calcium levels in the body.

Life History

Cookiecutter sharks are ovoviviparous. Hatching takes places between 12-22 months with 6-12 pups per litter. When the young emerge, they are fully developed and able to hunt for food by themselves. Males mature at 36 cm and can grow to a size of 42cm. Females mature at 39 cm and can reach up to 56 cm.

Ovoviviparous: eggs are retained within the body of the female in a brood chamber where the embryo develops, receiving nourishment from a yolk sac. This is the method of reproduction for the “live-bearing” fishes where pups hatch from egg capsules inside the mother’s uterus and are born soon afterward. Also known as aplacental viviparous.

Conservation Status & Comments

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